Fall 2013 - Episode 9: Hispanic Women, Catechisis and the Church
Highlighted Saints
Teresa of the Andes. Our Lady of Guadalupe

Saint Teresa of the Andes, O.C.D. (July 13, 1900 – April 12, 1920), also known as Saint Teresa of Jesus of the Andes (Spanish: Teresa de Jesús de los Andes), was a Chilean nun of the Discalced Carmelite order Teresa was born Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández y Solar in Santiago, Chile into an upper class family. Early in her life she read the autobiography of the French Carmelite nun Thérèse of Lisieux, who was later to be canonized herself. The experience had a profound effect on Juanita's already pious character, coming to the realization she wanted to live for God alone. She had to work to overcome a very self-centered personality toward being one which cared for others above all. Her further inspiration for this self-transformation was her upcoming First Communion, which led her to this commitment in an effort to be worthy of what she was to receive.

In 1919, at the age of 19, Juana entered the novitiate of the Discalced Carmelite nuns in the township of Los Andes, at which time she was given the name Teresa of Jesus. Toward the end of her short life, the new Sister Teresa began an apostolate of letter-writing, sharing her thoughts on the spiritual life with many people. Within a few months of her admission to the Order, however, she contracted typhus, which was diagnosed as fatal. She thereby died as a professed nun of the Order on April 12, 1920, which fell during Holy Week that year.

Teresa remains popular with the estimated 100,000 pilgrims who visit each year the shrine where her remains are venerated in the Sanctuary of Auco-Rinconada in the township of Los Andes, 60 miles (100 km.) from Santiago. She is Chile's first saint, and is especially popular among women and young people.

Our Lady of Guadalupe: In 1531, Jesus' own mother appeared to humble Juan Diego. The signs -- of the roses, of the uncle miraculously cured of a deadly illness, and especially of her beautiful image on Juan's mantle -- convinced the people there was something to be considered in Christianity. Within a short time, six million Native Mexicans had themselves baptized as Christians.
Mary appeared to Juan Diego not as a European Madonna but as a beautiful Aztec princess speaking to him in his own Aztec language. If we want to help someone appreciate the gospel we bring, we must appreciate the culture and the mentality in which they live their lives. By understanding them, we can help them to understand and know Christ.

Patron: Our Lady of Guadalupe is patron of the Americas
Janet's Homework Assignment
1) Visit and share Hispanics for Life Website – Hispanosprovida.org
2) Obtain Vida Humana Internacional (CD produced by Adolfo) to edúcate your Hispanic leaders. Hispanicsforlife.info

Extreme Makeover
Extreme Makeover by Teresa Tomeo

Teresa Tomeo pulls together the latest research on social behavior and trends to demonstrate that women are harming themselves and their chances for true happiness by adopting the thoroughly modern, sexually liberated lifestyle portrayed in magazines and movies. Packed with not only persuasive statistics but also powerful personal testimonies, Extreme Makeover shows that it is not the slogans of the sexual revolution and the women’s liberation movement that free and dignify women, but the beautiful teachings of the Catholic Church.

Recall Abortion: Ending the Abortion Industry's Exploitation of Women

by Janet Morana

Janet Morana exposes the myriad ways abortion exploits women, and calls for a National recall of this deadly procedure.

Sign the petition to recall abortion.
The Kitchen Madonna The Kitchen Madonna:
Patroness of The Catholic View for Women

Mary was not only Jesus' Mother, but also a housewife. Her utensils are earthly and heavenly symbols. The key represents the safety in the house and also the way into heaven. The kettle symbolizes nourishment for body and soul. The broom represents cleanliness in the home and in thoughts and deeds. 
Available from EWTN Religious Catalogue

The Magnificat

Magnificat is a lavishly printed, easy-to-read pocket-sized worship aid, of more than 400 pages.

Magnificat can be used to follow the daily Mass and can also be read at home for personal or family prayer.
Available at Magnificat
Consider praying the Divine Office on a daily basis. 
The Divine Office provides psalms and prayers to be prayed at different times of the day. 
See www.divineoffice.org.